Exam results

Lots of exams have been cancelled this year because of the coronavirus. If you're not sure what's happening or you're worried, then we've got advice to help. 

Worrying about results

The coronavirus has meant that most exams in the UK have been cancelled. This means your results in August may be carefully based on your work throughout the year, or things like your mock results.

You might be relieved about not having to take your exams, or be worried about getting a lower grade. It’s important to remember that the results are being judged as fairly as possible.

If you’re worried about what will happen, it’s important to talk to talk to someone you trust about how you're feeling. And Childline is always here for you.

Exam results days in 2020:

  • Scottish National 5 and Higher exam results - Tuesday 4 August

  • A-level results - Thursday 13 August

  • GCSE results - Thursday 20 August

  • See the UCAS website for more key dates.

Feeling unhappy with your results

It can be hard to feel satisfied if you haven't got the results you wanted, even if you’ve done well. Especially if you think you would’ve done better if you’d taken your exams. Whatever you're feeling, you're not alone.

If you’re not happy about your results or you think you should have been given a better grade, there are things you can do:

  • ask a teacher or someone you trust what they think
  • ask to take an exam when school reopens, or to sit the exam in 2021
  • make an appeal about how your grade was decided

Making an appeal or taking the exam doesn’t always mean you’ll get a better grade, but it can help if you think things would’ve been different if you had taken the exam.

What do I do now?

Telling your parents about your results

If you're disappointed with your exam results, you might find it hard to tell your parents or carers. But talking about your results can really help.

Your parents or carers can be there to support you and help you make decisions, whatever your results are. Even if they don't react well straight away, they should be there to support you after they've had time to think about it.

If you're worried, it can help to:

  • practise what you'd like to say before you speak to them and prepare yourself for how they might react.
  • tell them as soon as you can instead of putting it off
  • write a letter, or show them your results on paper to start the conversation
  • ask someone like a friend or teacher to be there with you when you tell them.

Building yourself back up

If you’ve gotten results that you’re disappointed with, there are always ways to start moving on and feeling better

  • Remind yourself of what you did well
    Big or small, it can help to list the things you did well in the exams, your coursework       or revision and in other parts of your life.
  • Do something that makes you feel good
    Seeing friends, running, watching a video or anything else you enjoy. It can help to avoid focusing on what people are saying on social media too.
  • Talk about how you're feeling
    Telling someone you trust how you feel can help you cope. Trying speaking to an adult you trust or a Childline counsellor. You could also keep track of how you're feeling after your result with the mood journal in your locker.
  • Decide what you want to do next
    Think about what else you could do if you didn't get the place or course you wanted. Ask for help from your teachers if you're not sure.