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Moved to uni and too nervous to eat

I've just moved to uni and I'm so nervous about the whole thing and am already feeling really homesick. When I get nervous I completely loose my appetite so I'm really struggling to eat and it's making me feel worse. i don't know how to get over this

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Sam

Hi there,

Getting used to a big change like moving away to university or boarding school can be very stressful. Sometimes stress can affect things like how we eat and how we sleep. Those things can than have an effect on everything else and make us feel even worse. Finding ways to get into a routine and make yourself feel at home is the key to getting settled in.

One of the things that can make home so comfortable is that it's often full of things we own and love. You might have favourite books, photographs or other things that you've owned for a long time. Having familiar possessions around you can make you feel secure and in control. When you go somewhere new and you don't have those things, you might feel more uncertain and anxious.

Getting used to the new space you're in and making it your own is a good step towards settling in. The things you bring to your new living space can be an expression of who you are, which should be the things you love the most. Making your room your own is really important. The more ownership you feel, the more comfortable you'll become.

Having a routine can really help too. Having set times when you eat, sleep and wake up can really make a big difference. Getting into a regular routine makes you feel like things are more normal. If everything is chaotic it can be harder to settle in.

Having your own space and finding ways to relax there may help you get back to a normal eating pattern. You might want to trying things like meditation, yoga or doing something active. These things can all help with stress, but you should find what works for you.

With time to adjust, you may find those nerves disappear eventually. But if you're still not eating normally after a while, it's a good idea to talk to an adult you trust or your GP. And don't forget that our counsellors are always here to support you.

Thanks for sending this letter.

Take care.

Sam

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